Mobile Tech Today

CIO Today Network Sites:   Top Tech News  |   CIO Today   |   Mobile Tech Today   |   Data Storage Today
News & Product Reviews for Mobile Tech Users
Vblock™ Systems:
Advanced converged infrastructure
increases productivity & lowers costs.

www.vce.com
Thursday, April 24th 
24/7/365 Network Uptime!
Trending Topics:   Security Heartbleed Big Data Cloud Computing Windows XP Data Centers OS X Mavericks
Home
Laptops & Tablets
Mobile Phones
Mobile Gadgets
Mobile Apps
BYOD & MDM
iPad
Mobile Industry News
Wireless Connectivity
Wireless Security
GPS & Maps
MTT Press Releases
 
Free Newsletters
Top CIO News
 
Mobile Tech Today
 

Digital Life

Facebook Testing Paid Message Service to Strangers' Inboxes

Facebook Testing Paid Message Service to Strangers
December 20, 2012 4:30PM

Bookmark and Share
The paid-message test would seem to run counter to Facebook's basic premise -- staying in touch with your chosen social circle. The new pay-for-Inbox-access opens the possibility of bombardment by job seekers or promotional campaigns. Facebook did say that, at least during the test, the message routing feature is only for personal messages.

Neustar, Inc. (NYSE: NSR) is a trusted, neutral provider of real-time information and analysis to the Internet, telecommunications, information services, financial services, retail, media and advertising sectors. Neustar applies its advanced, secure technologies in location, identification, and evaluation to help its customers promote and protect their businesses. More information is available at www.neustar.biz.

Would you like to be able to send a direct message to someone you don't know on Facebook? The social networking giant is testing such a paid service at $1 per message.

In a posting Thursday on the Facebook blog, the company said that it's starting "a small experiment to test the usefulness of economic signals to determine relevance." The test, Facebook said, would give the small number of test participants the option of paying to have a message sent directly to the Inbox, instead of ending up in the Other folder, of a recipient with whom they are not connected.

The company said that "several commentators and researchers" have pointed out that "imposing a financial cost on the sender" would be the most effective method of discouraging unwanted messages -- or of facilitating the delivery of relevant and useful messages.

Two New Filters

A typical use case, according to Facebook, might be a Facebook user wanting to send a message to someone who gave a speech the user heard, but who is not in the user's online social circle. Similarly, Facebook said, a user might want to message "someone about a job opportunity." It's not clear if Facebook envisions someone looking for or offering a job, although it could be either.

Some Facebook-watchers are suggesting that, in addition to being another possible revenue stream for Facebook, it could be a way to limit spam. However, $1 per message might be an acceptable charge for mass mailings from a large corporation or political group.

This test would seem to run counter to Facebook's basic premise -- staying in touch with your chosen social circle. The new pay-for-Inbox-access opens the possibility of bombardment by job seekers or promotional campaigns. The company did say that, at least during the test, the message routing feature is only for personal messages between individuals in the U.S., and the maximum number of such messages that a user might see is one per week.

The company is also introducing two new message filters, outside of the $1/message test. The Basic filter limits your Inbox to messages from friends or "people you may know," such as friends of friends. Basic is the same as the previous settings of "friends of friends" or "everyone."

New Privacy Settings

The other option is Strict Filtering, limiting your Inbox only to messages from friends. In either case, less desirable messages go to the Other folder. This setting is equivalent to the previous Friends setting.

Meanwhile, Facebook is rolling out new privacy settings, beginning with users in New Zealand. This latest round includes a privacy shortcut menu that is now part of the main toolbar at the top of a user's page on Facebook, and controls are broken down by specific questions, such as "Who can look me up?"

The Facebook empire is still echoing from the noise this week over changes in terms and conditions at its Instagram site. On Monday, Instagram's new Privacy Policy and Terms of Service were published, and users revolted over language indicating that the site could incorporate users' names, likenesses or photos into ads, without payment to or permission from users. Instagram subsequently said this interpretation was "not true" and that it was working to clarify the language.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Eldridge:

Posted: 2012-12-22 @ 1:45am PT
Looks to me like a copy of this idea:

http://adreama.blogspot.com/2012/09/pay-to-communicate-to.html



 Digital Life
1. Opera Coast Offers Safari Alternative
2. What Might an Amazon Phone Offer?
3. Google Maps, Now with Time Travel
4. NYPD Twitter Campaign Backfires
5. OnePlus One Boasts Android Weapon




 Most Popular Articles
1. Google Glass Finds a Home in Medical Education, Practice
2. HP Rolls Out New Software-Defined Network Products
3. Smartphone Kill Switch Could Save Users $2.6B a Year
4. Avaya Aims To End Network Waiting Game
5. Google Video Shows Off Modular Project Ara Phone

Have an informed opinion on this story?
Send a Letter to the Editor.
We want to know what you think.
Send us your Feedback.

 Related Topics  Latest News & Special Reports

  Opera Coast Offers Safari Alternative
  Salesforce Developing App SOS Button
  What Might an Amazon Phone Offer?
  OnePlus One Boasts Android Weapon
  Samsung Gear Fit Geared for Exercise

 Technology Marketplace
Business Intelligence
Get real-time, cloud-based information services with Neustar.
 
Cloud Computing
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
 
Contact Centers
HP delivers the future of the contact center with HP Qfiniti 10.
 
Data Storage
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Enterprise Hardware
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Hardware
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 
Network Security
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 

Network Security Spotlight
Tech Giants Fund Initiative To Prevent Future Heartbleeds
Can more funding prevent Heartbleed vulnerabilities in future open-source software? A new Core Infrastructure Initiative at the Linux Foundation is attempting to find out.
 
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 
Navigation
Mobile Tech Today
Home/Top News | Laptops & Tablets | Mobile Phones | Mobile Gadgets | Mobile Apps | BYOD & MDM | iPad
Mobile Industry News | Wireless Connectivity | Wireless Security | GPS & Maps | MTT Press Releases
Also visit these Enterprise Technology Sites
Top Tech News | CIO Today | Mobile Tech Today | Data Storage Today

Services:
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About CIO Today Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Services for PR Pros (In partnership with NewsFactor) | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 Mobile Tech Today. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.