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Innovation

Google Contact Lens Could Be Option for Diabetics

Google Contact Lens Could Be Option for Diabetics
January 26, 2014 6:17PM

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Smartphones, smart watches, and now a smart contact lens? Google has created a prototype contact lens that can make glucose monitoring for diabetic patients more convenient and less invasive than traditional finger pricks. The lenses boast thousands of miniaturized transistors and a hair-thin antenna that monitor glucose levels in tears.

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Brian Otis gingerly holds what looks like a typical contact lens on his index finger. Look closer. Sandwiched in this lens are two twinkling glitter-specks loaded with tens of thousands of miniaturized transistors. It's ringed with a hair-thin antenna. Together these remarkable miniature electronics can monitor glucose levels in tears of diabetics and then wirelessly transmit them to a handheld device.

"It doesn't look like much, but it was a crazy amount of work to get everything so very small," he said before the project was unveiled Thursday.

During years of soldering hair-thin wires to miniaturize electronics, Otis burned his fingertips so often that he can no longer feel the tiny chips he made from scratch in Google's Silicon Valley headquarters, a small price to pay for what he says is the smallest wireless glucose sensor ever made.

Just 35 miles away in the beach town of Santa Cruz, high school soccer coach and university senior Michael Vahradian, 21, has his own set of fingertip callouses, his from pricking himself up to 10 times a day for the past 17 years to draw blood for his glucose meter. A cellphone-sized pump on his hip that attaches to a flexible tube implanted in his stomach shoots rapid-acting insulin into his body around the clock.

"I remember at first it was really hard to make the needle sticks a habit because it hurt so much," he said. "And there are still times I don't want to do it -- it hurts and it's inconvenient. When I'm hanging out with friends, heading down to the beach to body-surf or going to lunch, I have to hold everyone up to take my blood sugar."

The idea that all of that monitoring could be going on passively, through a contact lens, is especially promising for the world's 382 million diabetics who need insulin and keep a close watch on their blood sugar.

The prototype, which Google says will take at least five years to reach consumers, is one of several medical devices being designed by companies to make glucose monitoring for diabetic patients more convenient and less invasive than traditional finger pricks.

The contact lenses were developed during the past 18 months in the clandestine Google X lab that also came up with a driverless car, Google's Web-surfing eyeglasses and Project Loon, a network of large balloons designed to beam the Internet to unwired places.

But research on the contact lenses began several years earlier at the University of Washington, where scientists worked under National Science Foundation funding. Until Thursday, when Google shared information about the project with The Associated Press, the work had been kept under wraps. (continued...)

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© 2014 Associated Press/AP Online syndicated under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:

Colleen:

Posted: 2014-04-18 @ 1:24am PT
this is amazing! Ive been a diabetic since 11 years old and now 45. you can imagine how tired i am of all the finger pricks! have good control but this will be an absolute relief and a huge benefit to my extremely active lifestyle.... hope to enjoy it soon... keep up the good work guys, you will be truly blessed!

Ed.:

Posted: 2014-03-10 @ 9:27am PT
@Pat: Sorry we don't have a specific contact regarding the trials. Hopefully reaching out to Google via their website and contact form will help.

pat:

Posted: 2014-03-10 @ 9:20am PT
how would someone become a tester for this?

kelly:

Posted: 2014-02-22 @ 10:16am PT
Would love to see something like this. My son has been diabetic since 16 months old now 14 yrs old. Lots of finger pricks. Cant even feel his fingertips anymore. Great when it becomes available...

F Konschak@ yahoo. com:

Posted: 2014-01-31 @ 9:28am PT
I think , it`s a fantastic, wonderful invention. I hope , I will live long enough to enjoy this . If not, I hope all the other millions of people that suffer with Diabetes will benefit by this .



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