Mobile Tech Today

CIO Today Network Sites:   Top Tech News  |   CIO Today   |   Mobile Tech Today   |   Data Storage Today
News & Product Reviews for Mobile Tech Users
Welcome to the new I.T.
One that streamlines service delivery
Learn how with new I.T. from BMC

Discover it here: www.bmc.com
Wednesday, April 16th 
Real-time info services with Neustar
Trending Topics:   Security Heartbleed Big Data Cloud Computing Windows XP Data Centers OS X Mavericks
Home
Laptops & Tablets
Mobile Phones
Mobile Gadgets
Mobile Apps
BYOD & MDM
iPad
Mobile Industry News
Wireless Connectivity
Wireless Security
GPS & Maps
MTT Press Releases
 
Free Newsletters
Top CIO News
 
Mobile Tech Today
 

World Wide Web

Some Pioneers of Digital Spying Have Misgivings

Some Pioneers of Digital Spying Have Misgivings
January 24, 2014 9:28AM

Bookmark and Share
An Internet intelligence pioneer, Thomas Drake, says it is a "heavy burden" to have broken new ground with digital-surveillance software and techniques decades ago only to see those tools now being used to collect email, Internet use, credit card and cellphone data from Americans as part of a system he considers unconstitutional.

Neustar, Inc. (NYSE: NSR) is a trusted, neutral provider of real-time information and analysis to the Internet, telecommunications, information services, financial services, retail, media and advertising sectors. Neustar applies its advanced, secure technologies in location, identification, and evaluation to help its customers promote and protect their businesses. More information is available at www.neustar.biz.

Former federal prosecutor Eric Friedberg conducted the first court-approved email wiretap nearly 20 years ago while investigating an international conspiracy to sell fraudulent cellphones.

"It was entirely novel. Even email was new," he says. "CompuServe, the provider, had no way to comply. They had to build a new port."

But today, Friedberg, an Internet intelligence pioneer who describes himself as "extremely pro-law enforcement," is among a growing number of former national security and law enforcement officials who are questioning the current scope of the National Security Agency's data-gathering programs.

"There's a legitimate public policy debate about whether it's worth a societal cost of having a permanent record of every person's telephone calls for a long time in a single place," says Friedberg, who grapples with this. Sometimes, he says, people's freedom "is protected by the difficulty that law enforcement has in obtaining records. If they can look at anything at the push of a button, abuses are more possible."

Last June, a series of news reports based on classified documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden began documenting government surveillance programs that included spying on friendly foreign leaders, analyzing email and Internet use, and gathering phone records of millions of Americans.

The disclosures triggered protests, congressional hearings and dozens of recommendations to limit broad sweeps of data. Last week, President Barack Obama adopted some of those, calling for an end to government control over vast amounts of phone data. Instead, Obama said, the telephone service providers or a third party should keep the bulk records, "with government accessing information as needed."

But he didn't go nearly as far as a consortium of former NSA staffers and intelligence agents had recommended in their own January letter to Obama asking him to dramatically limit government surveillance.

One of those former staffers, Thomas Drake, says it is a "heavy burden" to have broken new ground with digital-surveillance software and techniques decades ago only to see those tools now being used to collect email, Internet use, credit card and cellphone data from innocent Americans as part of a system he considers unconstitutional.

"I wake up at night in a cold sweat just thinking about what's been unleashed," he says.

Drake was part of a team in the late 1990s that developed a system to collect and analyze billions of electronic records to identify potential terrorist plots. But unlike current practices, he says, the system created back then would have kept U.S. citizens' data private through encryption that could be unscrambled only with a judicial order. (continued...)

1  |  2  |  Next Page >

 

© 2014 under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



 World Wide Web
1. How To Beat the Heartbleed Bug
2. Politics Test Silicon Valley, Russia
3. Why Netflix Got So Blazingly Fast
4. Twitter Acquires Data Analyzer Gnip
5. Google Proudly Scans Your Gmail




 Most Popular Articles
1. Will Satya Nadella Launch an Office for iPad?
2. Google Unveils Android Wear for Smart Watches
3. Microsoft Targets Evernote with Free OneNote, New Mac Version
4. HP Rolls Out New Software-Defined Network Products
5. Smartphone Kill Switch Could Save Users $2.6B a Year

 Related Topics  Latest News & Special Reports

  Google's Modular Phone Set for January
  CTIA Caves, Offers Kill Switch Plan
  Motorola Sells Enterprise Biz to Zebra
  Study: Samsung Phone vs. iPhone
  Twitter Acquires Data Analyzer Gnip

 Technology Marketplace

Business Intelligence
Get real-time, cloud-based information services with Neustar.
 
Cloud Computing
BMC's I.T. solutions unleash the power of your business
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
 
Contact Centers
HP delivers the future of the contact center with HP Qfiniti 10.
 
Data Storage
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
 
Enterprise Hardware
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
 
Enterprise I.T.
BMC's I.T. solutions unleash the power of your business
 
Hardware
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 
Network Security
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 

Network Security Spotlight
How To Beat the Heartbleed Bug
Heartbleed headlines continue as IT admins scramble for answers no one has. Early reports of stolen personal data, including 900 social insurance numbers in Canada, are starting to trickle in.
 
After Heartbleed, OpenSSL Calls for More Support
The president of the OpenSSL Foundation says more support is needed from companies and governments that use its software so that it can better spot and fix flawed pieces of code such as Heartbleed.
 
NSC Backs Disclosing Software Vulnerabilities
Disclosing vulnerabilities in commercial and open source software is in the national interest and shouldn't be withheld unless there is a clear need, says the National Security Council.
 

Enterprise Hardware Spotlight
Vaio Fit 11A Battery Danger Forces Recall by Sony
Using a Sony Vaio Fit 11A laptop? It's time to send it back to Sony. In fact, Sony is encouraging people to stop using the laptop after several reports of its Panasonic battery overheating.
 
Continued Drop in Global PC Shipments Slows
Worldwide shipments of PCs fell during the first three months of the year, but the global slump in PC demand may be easing, with a considerable slowdown from last year's drops.
 
Google Glass Finds a Home in Medical Education, Practice
Google Glass may find its first markets in verticals in which hands-free access to data is a boon. Medicine is among the most prominent of those, as seen in a number of Glass experiments under way.
 

Mobile Technology Spotlight
CTIA Caves, Volunteers Kill Switch Plan
After bucking against the concept of a smartphone kill switch, the CTIA just announced the “Smartphone Anti-Theft Voluntary Commitment” to thwart smartphone thefts in the U.S.
 
Is Amazon Launching a 3D Smartphone?
Once known for selling books on an e-commerce platform, Amazon is now a bona fide hardware maker -- and it's reportedly rolling out an innovative smartphone with a 3D screen.
 
Review: S5 Features Useful, Less About Gimmicks
There's a lot to like about Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone -- among them, its relative lack of features. Samsung chose to focus on features people might actually want, not gimmicks.
 

Navigation
Mobile Tech Today
Home/Top News | Laptops & Tablets | Mobile Phones | Mobile Gadgets | Mobile Apps | BYOD & MDM | iPad
Mobile Industry News | Wireless Connectivity | Wireless Security | GPS & Maps | MTT Press Releases
Also visit these Enterprise Technology Sites
Top Tech News | CIO Today | Mobile Tech Today | Data Storage Today

Services:
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About CIO Today Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Services for PR Pros (In partnership with NewsFactor) | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 Mobile Tech Today. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.