Mobile Tech Today

CIO Today Network Sites:   Top Tech News  |   CIO Today   |   Mobile Tech Today   |   Data Storage Today
News & Product Reviews for Mobile Tech Users
Thursday, April 24th 
Real-time info services with Neustar
Trending Topics:   Security Heartbleed Big Data Cloud Computing Windows XP Data Centers OS X Mavericks
Home
Laptops & Tablets
Mobile Phones
Mobile Gadgets
Mobile Apps
BYOD & MDM
iPad
Mobile Industry News
Wireless Connectivity
Wireless Security
GPS & Maps
MTT Press Releases
 
Free Newsletters
Top CIO News
 
Mobile Tech Today
 

World Wide Web

Some Pioneers of Digital Spying Have Misgivings

Some Pioneers of Digital Spying Have Misgivings
January 24, 2014 9:28AM

Bookmark and Share
An Internet intelligence pioneer, Thomas Drake, says it is a "heavy burden" to have broken new ground with digital-surveillance software and techniques decades ago only to see those tools now being used to collect email, Internet use, credit card and cellphone data from Americans as part of a system he considers unconstitutional.

Barium Ferrite Is The Future Of Tape: Barium Ferrite (BaFe) offers greater capacity, superior performance, and longer archival life compared to legacy metal particle (MP) tape. Click here to learn more.

Former federal prosecutor Eric Friedberg conducted the first court-approved email wiretap nearly 20 years ago while investigating an international conspiracy to sell fraudulent cellphones.

"It was entirely novel. Even email was new," he says. "CompuServe, the provider, had no way to comply. They had to build a new port."

But today, Friedberg, an Internet intelligence pioneer who describes himself as "extremely pro-law enforcement," is among a growing number of former national security and law enforcement officials who are questioning the current scope of the National Security Agency's data-gathering programs.

"There's a legitimate public policy debate about whether it's worth a societal cost of having a permanent record of every person's telephone calls for a long time in a single place," says Friedberg, who grapples with this. Sometimes, he says, people's freedom "is protected by the difficulty that law enforcement has in obtaining records. If they can look at anything at the push of a button, abuses are more possible."

Last June, a series of news reports based on classified documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden began documenting government surveillance programs that included spying on friendly foreign leaders, analyzing email and Internet use, and gathering phone records of millions of Americans.

The disclosures triggered protests, congressional hearings and dozens of recommendations to limit broad sweeps of data. Last week, President Barack Obama adopted some of those, calling for an end to government control over vast amounts of phone data. Instead, Obama said, the telephone service providers or a third party should keep the bulk records, "with government accessing information as needed."

But he didn't go nearly as far as a consortium of former NSA staffers and intelligence agents had recommended in their own January letter to Obama asking him to dramatically limit government surveillance.

One of those former staffers, Thomas Drake, says it is a "heavy burden" to have broken new ground with digital-surveillance software and techniques decades ago only to see those tools now being used to collect email, Internet use, credit card and cellphone data from innocent Americans as part of a system he considers unconstitutional.

"I wake up at night in a cold sweat just thinking about what's been unleashed," he says.

Drake was part of a team in the late 1990s that developed a system to collect and analyze billions of electronic records to identify potential terrorist plots. But unlike current practices, he says, the system created back then would have kept U.S. citizens' data private through encryption that could be unscrambled only with a judicial order. (continued...)

1  |  2  |  Next Page >

 

© 2014 Associated Press/AP Online syndicated under contract with NewsEdge. All rights reserved.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



 World Wide Web
1. Google Maps, Now with Time Travel
2. NYPD Twitter Campaign Backfires
3. Net Gets Faster, But Easier to Attack
4. Verizon Report Exposes Cyberthreats
5. Aereo CEO Speaks Out on Future




 Most Popular Articles
1. Google Glass Finds a Home in Medical Education, Practice
2. HP Rolls Out New Software-Defined Network Products
3. Smartphone Kill Switch Could Save Users $2.6B a Year
4. Avaya Aims To End Network Waiting Game
5. Google Video Shows Off Modular Project Ara Phone

 Related Topics  Latest News & Special Reports

  OnePlus One Boasts Android Weapon
  Samsung Gear Fit Geared for Exercise
  Google Sharpens Contact Lens Vision
  Samsung: $2.2B Too Much for Apple
  Review: Windows Phone Advances

 Technology Marketplace
Business Intelligence
Get real-time, cloud-based information services with Neustar.
 
Cloud Computing
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
 
Contact Centers
HP delivers the future of the contact center with HP Qfiniti 10.
 
Data Storage
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Enterprise Hardware
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Hardware
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 
Network Security
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 

Network Security Spotlight
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 
Where Do Web Sites Stand, Post-Heartbleed?
A security firm says the vast majority of Web sites have patched themselves to protect against the Heartbleed bug, but now there are questions raised on the reliability of open-source programs.
 
Navigation
Mobile Tech Today
Home/Top News | Laptops & Tablets | Mobile Phones | Mobile Gadgets | Mobile Apps | BYOD & MDM | iPad
Mobile Industry News | Wireless Connectivity | Wireless Security | GPS & Maps | MTT Press Releases
Also visit these Enterprise Technology Sites
Top Tech News | CIO Today | Mobile Tech Today | Data Storage Today

Services:
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About CIO Today Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Services for PR Pros (In partnership with NewsFactor) | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 Mobile Tech Today. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.